Adjective to adverb sentences. Examples of Adjectives 2018-12-30

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What Is an Adjective Complement?

adjective to adverb sentences

She completely destroyed her new car. Words like more or less are added to the main adverb when comparing two things. Which way has she been feeling all week? Remember that some types of are dependent, meaning that they cannot stand alone. You are actively smelling with your nose here, so use the adverb. The adjectives that point out nouns are called demonstrative adjectives.


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How to Recognize Adverbs and Adjectives in a Sentence

adjective to adverb sentences

Be sure to make use of these clauses and phrases in your writing whenever they apply; they're fantastic methods of elaboration. We've got plenty of goodness right here. The adverb tomorrow indicates when something will be done. It is important, therefore, that you know whether you need an adjective or an adverb in the sentences you want to say or write. Summary: This worksheet discusses the differences between adjectives and adverbs.

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Examples of Adjectives

adjective to adverb sentences

To form a comparative, you'll need to use an -er ending or the word more. Ready to have some fun? To form a superlative, you'll need to use an -est ending or the word most. Question 2: What are the Different Kinds of Adverbs? Verb Complements Verb complements are phrases or clauses, like adjective complements. However, they are generally considered as adjectives of quality. Adverbs Exercises The following exercises will help you gain greater understanding about how adverbs work.

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Use Adverb In Sentence Worksheets

adjective to adverb sentences

Use the verb 'to be' with these expressions. Adjective lists will help you build a more advanced vocabulary. For instance, in the sentence below, the adjective sad modifies the noun smile the of the sentence. They can come in the form of individual words — so, since, thus, because — but also clauses — so that, in order to. Adverbs of Time Adverbs of time, while seemingly similar to adverbs of frequency, tell us when something happens.

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Adjectives and Adverbs

adjective to adverb sentences

Adverbs of frequency examples in the following sentences are in bold for easy identification. However, not every adverb follows this pattern. In their comparative and superlative forms, these adjectives would become softer, colder, and younger, and softest, coldest, and youngest. About Use the following adjectives followed by 'about'. Adverbs answer questions like When? Use the verb 'to be' with these expressions. Object Complements An object complement is one or more words which acts as an adjective or noun and modifies or refers to the direct object of the sentence.

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Use Adverb In Sentence Worksheets

adjective to adverb sentences

Here, the adverb 'completely' modifies the verb 'destroyed' to answer the question To what extent? It is usually comes right before the noun or the pronoun that it modifies. The most common question that adverbs answer is how. Good describes your fragrance, not how you smell with your nose, so using the adjective is correct. Adverbs of purpose examples in the following sentences are in bold for easy identification. Each of the words that tell how many in those sentences - 'two,' 'some,' and 'many' - is an adjective. Where would we be without? The adjective phrase can be placed before, or after, the noun or pronoun in the sentence.

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Adjective Phrase Examples

adjective to adverb sentences

Why is this person happy? Let's say you want to tell a friend which car is yours in the parking lot. Absolutely Certain Completely Heartily Really Certain adverbs called adverbs of manner tell us about the way in which something was done. Adjective clauses can also be called relative clauses. Notice how the adjectives are formed by adding -ly to the adjectives bad, correct and quick, although there is a slight spelling change when forming an adverb with the adjective easy. What kind of man is he? An describes, or modifies, a noun or pronoun. A Defiant Homeless Q Adorable Delightful Homely Quant Adventurous Depressed Horrible R Aggressive Determined Hungry Real Agreeable Different Hurt Relieved Alert Difficult I Repulsive Alive Disgusted Ill Rich Amused Distinct Important S Angry Disturbed Impossible Scary Annoyed Dizzy Inexpensive Selfish Annoying Doubtful Innocent Shiny Anxious Drab Inquisitive Shy Arrogant Dull Itchy Silly Ashamed E J Sleepy Attractive Eager Jealous Smiling Average Easy Jittery Smoggy Awful Elated Jolly Sore B Elegant Joyous Sparkling Bad Embarrassed K Splendid Beautiful Enchanting Kind Spotless Better Encouraging L Stormy Bewildered Energetic Lazy Strange Black Enthusiastic Light Stupid Bloody Envious Lively Successful Blue Evil Lonely Super Blue-eyed Excited Long T Blushing Expensive Lovely Talented Bored Exuberant Lucky Tame Brainy F M Tender Brave Fair Magificent Tense Breakable Faithful Misty Terrible Bright Famous Modern Tasty Busy Fancy Motionless Thankful C Fantastic Muddy Thoughtful Calm Fierce Mushy Thoughtless Careful Filthy Mysterious Tired Cautious Fine N Tough Charming Foolish Nasty Troubled Cheerful Fragile Naughty U Clean Frail Nervous Ugliest Clear Frantic Nice Ugly Clever Friendly Nutty Uninterested Cloudy Frightened O Unsightly Clumsy Funny Obedient Unusual Colorful G Obnoxious Upset Combative Gentle Odd Uptight Comfortable Gifted Old-fashioned V Concerned Glamorous Open Vast Condemned Gleaming Outrageous Victorious Confused Glorious Outstanding Vivacious Cooperative Good P W Courageous Gorgeous Panicky Wandering Crazy Graceful Perfect Weary Creepy Grieving Plain Wicked Crowded Grotesque Pleasant Wide-eyed Cruel Grumpy Poised Wild Curious H Poor Witty Cute Handsome Powerful Worrisome D Happy Precious Worried Dangerous Healthy Prickly Wrong Dark Helpful Proud Z Dead Helpless Puzzled Zany Defeated Hilarious Zealous More Adjective Lists If you're looking for even more lists of descriptive words, you can choose from YourDictionary's extensive from A to Z. There are many rules for using adverbs, and these rules often depend upon which type of adverb you are using.

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Examples of Adjectives

adjective to adverb sentences

This lesson covers the rules for using adjectives and adverbs correctly, including those used in comparisons. Exceptions There are a couple of exceptions when it comes to forming the comparative and superlative forms of adjectives and adverbs, and you're probably already familiar with them. Even though all of the sample sentences above have one-word adverbs, adverbs are not limited to a single word. . Each group of adjectives have the same or related meanings. That's why reading is such a gift. You might point to your car to demonstrate that it's yours, and you might say, That car is mine.

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Examples of Adjectives

adjective to adverb sentences

Pay close attention to how the noun is modified, as this is the final criteria when deciding between an adjective and adverb. The demonstrative adjectives this and that can identify singular nouns and pronouns, and the demonstrative adjectives these and those can identify plural nouns. To Describe Taste Abrasive Embarrassed Grumpy Abrupt Energetic Kind Afraid Enraged Lazy Agreeable Enthusiastic Lively Aggressive Envious Lonely Amiable Evil Lucky Amused Excited Mad Angry Exhausted Manic Annoyed Exuberant Mysterious Ashamed Fair Nervous Bad Faithful Obedient Bitter Fantastic Obnoxious Bewildered Fierce Outrageous Boring Fine Panicky Brave Foolish Perfect Callous Frantic Persuasive Calm Friendly Pleasant Calming Frightened Proud Charming Funny Quirky Cheerful Furious Relieved Combative Gentle Repulsive Comfortable Glib Rundown Defeated Glorious Sad Confused Good Scary Cooperative Grateful Selfish Courageous Grieving Silly Cowardly Gusty Splendid Crabby Gutless Successful Creepy Happy Tedious Cross Healthy Tense Cruel Heinous Terrible Dangerous Helpless Thankful Defeated Hilarious Thoughtful Defiant Hungry Thoughtless Delightful Hurt Tired Depressed Hysterical Troubled Determined Immoral Upset Disgusted Impassioned Weak Disturbed Indignant Weary Eager Irate Wicked Elated Itchy Worried Embarrassed Jealous Zany Enchanting Jolly Zealous To Describe a Person or Personality Aggressive Famous Restless Agoraphobic Fearless Rich Ambidextrous Fertile Righteous Ambitious Fragile Ritzy Amoral Frank Romantic Angelic Functional Rustic Brainy Gabby Ruthless Breathless Generous Sassy Busy Gifted Secretive Calm Helpful Sedate Capable Hesitant Shy Careless Innocent Sleepy Cautious Inquisitive Somber Cheerful Insane Stingy Clever Jaunty Stupid Common Juicy Super Complete Macho Swanky Concerned Manly Tame Crazy Modern Tawdry Curious Mushy Terrific Dead Naughty Testy Deep Odd Uninterested Delightful Old Vague Determined Open Verdant Different Outstanding Vivacious Diligent Perky Wacky Energetic Poor Wandering Erratic Powerful Wild Evil Puzzled Womanly Exuberant Real Wrong To Describe Appearance Ablaze Distinct Quirky Adorable Drab Ruddy Alluring Dull Shiny Attractive Elegant Skinny Average Embarrassed Sloppy Awkward Fancy Smiling Balanced Fat Sparkling Beautiful Filthy Spotless Blonde Glamorous Strange Bloody Gleaming Tacky Blushing Glossy Tall Bright Graceful Thin Clean Grotesque Ugly Clear Handsome Unattractive Cloudy Homely Unbecoming Clumsy Interior Uncovered Colorful Lovely Unsightly Confident Magnificent Unusual Cracked Murky Watery Crooked Old-fashioned Weird Crushed Plain Wild Curly Poised Wiry Cute Pretty Wooden Debonair Puffy Worried Dirty Quaint Zaftig To Describe Situations Accidental Doubtful Main Achievable Elementary Minor Advantageous Finger-printed Nasty Alcoholic Groundless Nutritious Animated Hard Obsolete Aquatic Harmful Optimal Aromatic High Organic Aspiring Honest Premium Bad Horrible Quizzical Bawdy Illegal Rainy Biographical Illegible Redundant Bizarre Imperfect Remarkable Broken Impossible Simple Careful Internal Tangible Credible Inventive Tricky Creepy Jazzy Wholesale Cumbersome Juvenile Worse Disastrous Legal Wry Dismissive Logical X-rated Mind Your Love for Adjectives Now that we've seen a nice sampling of adjectives, there's one thing left to note. When we spend some time examining examples of , we, too, can electrify our writing with the appropriate injection of adjectival beauty. In other words, you wouldn't ever use '-er' and 'more', or '-est' and 'most. How would we describe a pretty flower or enjoy an enchanting evening? How would we describe a pretty flower or enjoy an enchanting evening? Adjectives You may recall learning in school that adjectives answer the questions Which one? For example: My basket is bigger than her basket. If we remove the adjective clause from the first example above, then we lose a necessary piece of information that changes the meaning of the sentence: Generally, if the adjective clause is needed to clear up any ambiguity about which noun is being talked about i.

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Adjective Clause Examples

adjective to adverb sentences

The new father lowered the baby into her crib very slowly. Adverbs of time are usually placed at the end of a sentence. Adverb Clauses A close cousin of the adjective clause, the adverb clause functions in much the same way, except adverb clauses modify nouns or adjectives. Almost Enough So Too Quite Rather Very Some adverbs are used as intensifiers. Adjective of Quantity Adjectives of quantity indicate the quantity of nouns and pronouns. Noun Clause A is simply two or more words that function as a noun.

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